Our Strategy & Impact

People Behind the Progress

It takes teamwork to bring new treatments to cancer patients. Scientists, patients, and donors make it possible for us to create lifesaving therapies. Thanks to our community, we continue to fund groundbreaking scientific studies leading to the next great discoveries. We launch clinical trials that give patients new options and hope. And we bring all of us closer to a world free from the fear of cancer.

Read more below about the important people behind the progress at CRI.

All Stories

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  • Jonathan Cebon

    Focus on Skin Cancer: CRI/Ludwig Cancer Vaccine Collaborative Investigator Dr. Jonathan Cebon

    Clinical investigator Dr. Jonathan Cebon at the Joint Austin/Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research Medical Oncology Unit at Austin Hospital in Melbourne, Australia, is using vaccines to treat melanoma patients.
  • Tim Stobo

    Surviving Melanoma with the Sunscreen On

    Australian Tim Stobo knew from the public service advisories that malignant melanoma was a growing problem in his country. When the disease struck him, he wanted to fight back, so he enrolled in a CRI/LICR Cancer Vaccine Collaborative clinical trial of a new vaccine to treat melanoma.
  • Hugh Kennedy

    Donor Travels the World While Making a Difference

    Retiree Hugh Kennedy lets his gift of annuities to the Cancer Research Institute do the funding, while he enjoys his travels all over the world.
  • Etienne Gagnon, Ph.D.

    CRI Postdoctoral Fellow Wins Prestigious Award

    Etienne Gagnon, a CRI postdoctoral fellow, was awarded the Canadian Institutes of Health Research 2008 BIOTECanada/Schering-Plough Canada Fellowship.
  • Ken Barmore

    A Catalyst for Innovation in Cancer Research

    A Chicago manufacturer and prostate cancer survivor, Ken established a charitable remainder annuity with CRI because he wanted to support an improved and more effective cancer treatment through immunology.
  • Sharon Belvin's children, LillyBeth and James

    Sharon Belvin: A Cancer "Miracle"

    Sharon was only 22-years-old when doctors told her she had advanced melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. An immunotherapy pulled her back from the brink of death. Today, this proud mother of two is still cancer free.
  • Rex and Virginia Ashdown

    Helping Scientists Take Steps in Cancer Research

    Virginia, a breast cancer survivor, and her husband Rex, a non-Hodgkins lymphoma survivor, contributed their unitrust to CRI so that other patients in the future could benefit from lifesaving cancer research.
  • Geoffrey O. Coley

    Geoffrey O. Coley Continues His Great-grandfather's Legacy

    Great-nephew of CRI's founder, Helen Coley Nauts, CRI trustee Geoff Coley is committed to furthering the Institute's mission. "We need to speed up the advancement of new vaccines and therapies so we can begin to treat real patients now.”