Qian Yin, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow, Lloyd J. Old FellowStanford University

This CRI Fellowship allows me to freely design my research and is also a tool to increase participation in the research process and initiate global collaborations.
Area of Research: Melanoma, All Cancers

T cells are very potent anti-tumor immune cells, but sometimes they become “exhausted” and need a stimulus to regain their cancer-killing ability. Since many cancer patients already possess T cells that recognize tumors, reinvigorating these cells could be useful in immunotherapy approaches. Dr. Yin is trying to do just that, by using nanoparticles to deliver stimulants to these exhausted T cells. This targeted delivery, along with a slow rate of release, prevents much of the toxicity associated with systemic administration of these factors. Dr. Yin will continue to characterize the behavior and signaling activity of these T cells, both before and after activation, to determine additional ways for immunotherapy approaches to harness T cells.

Immunotherapy is a new and powerful tool to treat cancer and will bring more hope into cancer patients’ lives. This CRI Fellowship allows me to freely design my research and is also a tool to increase participation in the research process and initiate global collaborations.

Projects and Grants

Activation of endogenous anergic self-specific CD8+ T cells by polymeric nanoparticles for enhanced cancer immunotherapy

Stanford University | All Cancers, Melanoma | 2016 | Mark M. Davis, Ph.D.

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*Immunotherapy results may vary from patient to patient.

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