Najla Arshad, Ph.D., Postdoctoral FellowYale University

The CRI Irvington Fellowship has encouraged me to follow through on the ideas that I have, and I hope that however great or small my contribution to the field, it someday helps someone.
Area of Research: Leukemia, Multiple Myeloma

The immune system identifies other human cells via the MHC system, which displays molecules called antigens. By looking at these antigens, immune cells can recognize and eliminate cancer cells, but unfortunately cancer cells can alter the MHC system and avoid detection. The protein calreticulin (CRT), which is involved in proper MHC function, is mutated in certain blood cancers. However, we don’t know exactly how this affects the MHC system. To fix that, Dr. Arshad is characterizing how CRT mutations influence immune responses against cancer, which may lead to approaches to address this in patients and improve their outcomes.

As I started to develop my CRI proposal, my father was diagnosed with lymphoma. I thought of the years of research from so many scientists and doctors that eventually resulted in my father being alive today. I want to contribute to that, and the CRI Irvington Fellowship has encouraged me to follow through on the ideas that I have, and I hope that however great or small my contribution to the field, it someday helps someone.

Dr. Najla Arshad, CRI-Funded Scientist: I want to contribute to the research from scientists and doctors that has resulted in my loved ones being alive today.

Projects and Grants

The effect of tumor-associated mutant calreticulin on antigen presentation and tumorigenesis

Yale University | Leukemia, Multiple Myeloma | 2015 | Peter Cresswell, Ph.D., FRS

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