Jedd D. Wolchok, M.D., Ph.D., Clinical Accelerator Investigator Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

Area of Research: Breast Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Kidney Cancer, Ovarian Cancer

Dr. Jedd Wolchok is the Lloyd J. Old/Virginia and Daniel K. Ludwig Chair in clinical investigation, chief of the immune-oncology service, and director of the Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. He is additionally the associate director of the Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy. Dr. Wolchok is one of the two study chairs of the clinical trial “A Phase 1 Study to Evaluate MEDI4736 in Combination With Tremelimumab” (NCT01975831).

This study examines combinations of two checkpoint immunotherapies, in patients diagnosed with breast cancer, cervical cancer, colorectal cancer, kidney cancer, and ovarian cancer. One checkpoint inhibitor, durvalumab (Imfinzi™), blocks the PD-L1 pathway, whereas the other, tremelimumab, blocks the CTLA-4 pathway.

Additional investigators working on this trial include:

  • Margaret Callahan, M.D., Ph.D. (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)
  • Kunle Odunsi, M.D., Ph.D. (Roswell Park Cancer Institute)
  • Patrick Ott, M.D., Ph.D. (Dana Farber Cancer Institute)
  • Antoni Ribas, M.D., Ph.D. (University of California, Los Angeles)
  • Patrick Dillon M.D. (University of Virginia Health)
  • Mario Sznol, M.D. (Yale University)
  • Reva Schneider, M.D. (Mary Crowley Cancer Center)

Dr. Wolchok is also the study chair of "Trial of TRX518 (Anti-GITR mAb) in Stage III or IV Malignant Melanoma or Other Solid Tumors (TRX518-001)” (NCT01239134).

Melanoma impacts approximately 290,000 individuals each year, resulting in around 61,000 deaths. In the United States alone, there were an estimated 91,000 new cases and 9,000 deaths in 2018. While the 5-year survival rate for early stage melanoma is 98%, metastatic melanoma only has a survival rate of 17%.

This trial examines the impact of TRX518, an immunomodulator that targets the GITR pathway, in patients diagnosed with advanced solid tumors. GITR is a co-stimulatory checkpoint that appears to promote the activity of “killer” T cells. Stimulating this pathway may ultimately improve the immune system’s response in fighting cancer.

Additional investigators working on this trial include:

  • Henry Koon, M.D. (University Hospitals)
  • Dale Shepard, M.D. (Cleveland Clinic)
  • Margaret Callahan, M.D., Ph.D. (Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center)

Projects and Grants

A Phase 1 Study to Evaluate MEDI4736 in Combination With Tremelimumab (NCT01975831)

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | Breast Cancer, Cervical Cancer, Colorectal Cancer, Kidney Cancer, Ovarian Cancer | 2013

Trial of TRX518 (Anti-GITR mAb) in Stage III or IV Malignant Melanoma or Other Solid Tumors (TRX518-001) (NCT01239134)

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center | Melanoma | 2010

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